NUR-550 Translational Research Graphic Organizer

NUR-550 Translational Research Graphic Organizer

NUR-550 Translational Research Graphic Organizer

Nursing Practice Problem:

The selected nursing issue for the evidence-based practice (EBP) project is medication errors in nursing that happen due to staffing shortage. Medication errors are a significant problem in healthcare sector, especially at this time when there is nursing shortage and high nurse turnovers. With reduced number of nurses working in the healthcare sector, the susceptibility of patients to medication errors increases, particularly adverse drug events that can lead to death and prolonged stays in hospitals (Buerhaus et al., 2017). The project will focus on the effectiveness of implementation of health information technology compared to the conventional ways of medication management to mitigate medication errors in critically ill patients. The selection of critically ill patients as the population of interest emanates from their increased vulnerability to injuries that need high-risk medication and more use of intravenous infusions which raises the possibility of medication errors. Health information technology can play an essential role in enhancing efficiency of nurses to offer required care and reduce medication errors.

Comparing research designs is essential to enhancing better understanding of the application and nature. Through effective understanding, nurses can apply evidence-based research into clinical practice to address issues and offer improve patient care. As such, the translational research graphic organizer compares one translational study to quantitative study, and one translational study to qualitative study.

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Comparison 1: Translational Research vs. Qualitative Research

Criteria Peer-Reviewed Translational Article and Permalink/Working Link: Härkänen, M., Vehviläinen-Julkunen, K., Murrells, T., Rafferty, A. M., & Franklin, B. D. (2019). Medication administration errors and mortality: incidents reported in England and Wales between 2007 ̶ 2016. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 15(7), 858-863. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2018.11.010 Translational Research Type: T2 Peer-Reviewed Traditional Article and Permalink/Working Link: Barakat, S. & Franklin, B. D. (2020). An Evaluation of the Impact of Barcode Patient and Medication Scanning on Nursing Workflow at a UK Teaching Hospital. Pharmacy (Basel), 8(3):148.  doi: 10.3390/pharmacy8030148 Traditional Qualitative Research Type: Observational Research Observations (Similarities/Differences)
Methodology The researchers reported cases between 2007 and 2016 from the National Reporting and Learning System for England and Wales. The article also analyzes the deaths reported and categorizes drugs based on various parameters that include, year, age, location, and category of error using incidents’ initial classification. The study was a comparative research with direct observation approach used in the two settings within acute surgical wards in UK hospital. In both studies, the researchers use hypotheses to understand the phenomena under study. In both studies, the researchers actively participate in the research process. However, researchers can manipulate the outcomes and research design in qualitative study but cannot in translational research.
Goals The study’s goals include analysis of medication administration errors reported in acute care that led to death, know the involved drugs, and offer a description of administration error features like location type of error and patient age. The authors assert that little is known about the use of barcode medication administration. Therefore, the researchers sought to evaluate the effects of barcode patient and medication scanning on nursing flow at a teaching hospital in the UK. In both studies, the researchers’ focus is to improve practice interventions on the issue of medication administration errors. Conversely, the translational research’s mainfocus is to enhance practice and not produce new knowledge. In this case, the translational research article seeks to improvereporting and knowledge about the effects of medication errors. However, the qualitative research seeks new knowledge about the use barcode scanning.
Data Collection The authors collected data from incident reporting in acute care setting. The data came from the National Reporting and Learning System of England and Wales. The researchers collected data on drug rounds through observation on different parameters that include duration, timelines of medication administration, identity of patients, verification of medications and the overall workflow patterns in the two facilities. Both collect data from different sources. However, qualitative study uses primary data collected through observation while the translational study uses secondary data from the reporting mechanism used in England and Wales.

Comparison 2: Translational Research vs. Quantitative Research

            Criteria Peer-Reviewed Translational Article and Permalink/Working Link: Flott, K., Nelson, D., Moorcroft, T., Mayer, E. K., Gage, W., Redhead, J. & Darzi, A. W. (2018).  Enhancing Safety Culture Through Improved Incident Reporting: A Case Study in Translational Research, Health Affairs, 37(11).  https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2018.0706 Translational Research Type: Peer-Reviewed Traditional Article and Permalink/Working Link: Alomari, A., Sheppard-Law, S., Lewis, J. & Wilson, V. (2020). Effectiveness of Clinical Nurses’ interventions in reducing medication errors in a pediatric ward. The Journal of Clinical Nursing, 29(17-18): 3403-3413. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15374 Traditional Quantitative Research Type: Action Research (AR) three-phase study. Observations (Similarities/Differences)
Methodology The article uses a case study approach to report on an initiative by two large healthcare organizations and providers on the effects of using a learning health systems cycle of interventions. The article used a quantitative research method comprising of three phases of action research. The first phase focused on developing an overview of the medication practice while the second developed and implemented targeted interventions. The third phase evaluated the implemented interventions. Both studies use unique methodologies based on the interests of the researchers. Both do not involve the researchers in designing the methodology and its implementation.
Goals The goals of the study are enhancement of patient safety culture using improved reporting of incidents and learning to shape a more just organization culture.  The aims and objectives of the study was to evaluate the effects of bundle interventions that nurses can develop and implement to reduce medication administration error rates. The article also focused on enhancing nurses’ medication administration practice. The translational study’s focus is to enhance patient safety culture through effective reporting. However, the quantitative study seeks developing new knowledge for nurses to reduce medication administration errors. The quantitative study also focuses on improving nurses’ understanding of the medication administration practice
Data Collection The authors collected data from frontline-staff who implemented seven evidence-based interventions. Through observation, the researchers monitored and recorded reported incidents based on several indicators, including reported harms. The researchers collected data from the six recruited clinical pediatric nurses as part of the action research team. Data collection comprised of medication incident data, medical policy audits using a questionnaire. Both collect data from participants in different patient settings. Both show that data is an important part of any research as it validates the developed hypotheses.

Conclusion

The articles from translational research and traditional research approaches show the effects of the different study approaches in gathering data and evidence on medication errors. The articles demonstrate the need for researchers to use research designs that will lead to enhanced and quality findings to translate into evidence-based practice interventions in clinical practice. The implication is that translational and traditional research approaches differ while also agree on certain aspects of research. 

References

Alomari, A., Sheppard-Law, S., Lewis, J. & Wilson, V. (2020). Effectiveness of Clinical Nurses’ interventions in reducing medication

errors in a pediatric ward. The Journal of Clinical Nursing, 29(17-18): 3403-3413.

https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15374

Barakat, S. & Franklin, B. D. (2020). An Evaluation of the Impact of Barcode Patient and Medication Scanning on Nursing Workflow

at a UK Teaching Hospital. Pharmacy (Basel), 8(3):148.  doi: 10.3390/pharmacy8030148

Flott, K., Nelson, D., Moorcroft, T., Mayer, E. K., Gage, W., Redhead, J. & Darzi, A. W. (2018).  Enhancing Safety Culture Through

Improved Incident Reporting: A Case Study in Translational Research, Health Affairs, 37(11).

https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2018.0706

Härkänen, M., Vehviläinen-Julkunen, K., Murrells, T., Rafferty, A. M., & Franklin, B. D. (2019). Medication administration errors

and mortality: incidents reported in England and Wales between 2007 ̶ 2016. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 15(7), 858-863.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2018.11.010
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